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27 Minutes Could Save You A Gazillion Dollars On Your Internet Bill

April 26, 2017

Disclosure: Some links to products on this website will earn an affiliate commission.

Raise your hand if you love giving money to Comcast or Time Warner?

 

Yeah, thought so.

Have you looked at your internet statement lately? Are you paying to rent a modem and router combo? Is it about $10/mo + tax?

 

How long have you had internet? Since you were 9?  So at least 15 years, right?

 

12 months * 15 years = 180 months

 

180 months * $10 = $1800.

 

$1800!!!! TO RENT A MODEM

 

Do you feel Fleeced? 

 

good.

 

What if I told you that you could buy your own modem and router and set them up in 27 minutes or less?

 

Would you accept a savings of a gajillion dollars?

 

Here’s how:

 

Step 1: Overcome your tech anxiety. Erase the image of your tortured self spending your entire Saturday on the phone with Comcast. Reassure yourself that this is a matter of plugging two (literally two) cables into two boxes and waiting for lights to blink. Done dreading Comcast temporarily? Ok, let's go. 

 

Step 2: Are you......

 

(A) setting up internet for the first time  > >  Proceed to Step 3

 

or are you......

 

(B) replacing your Comcast demon-modem that has been fleecing you for decades? > >  Proceed to Step 4

 

Step 3: Set up Xfinity online at www.xfinity.com. Create an account and give it your address.

 

They will send you a Comcast Self-Install Kit. Read more here.  It will probably come with a "coaxial cord" and "splitter."

 

Or if you don’t want to wait around, buy them yourself for pennies.

How do you know if you need a splitter and wtf is it? A splitter does just that – it splits what’s coming out of your circular wall doohickey (aka your cable wall outlet) into cable and internet. If you’re a millennial and you don’t have cable TV, then you don’t need a splitter. If you just use internet, your coaxial cable will go directly from the wall into your modem and bring you the internet.

 

Step 4: Pick and buy a modem. You need to pick a modem that is compatible with your service provider.

 

Comcast Compatible Modems

 

Time Warner Compatible Modems

 

Pull up an Amazon page and start shopping for these model numbers. Pick a price and style that appeal to you. Read reviews to make sure it’s a good one. Feel free to purchase a used one.

 

I have Comcast and purchased this modem. I got it in Used – Like New condition for a fraction of the price.

 

 

Step 5: Pick and buy a router. Any router. Literally any router on Amazon that has good reviews. Here's the router I got: 

 

 Step 6: Compile all your goodies and call Comcast at 1-800-934-6489

 

I know, I know, the thought of it is truly nauseating. Remember Step 1? You agreed to suspend disbelief for the purpose of this exercise in saving a gajillion dollars. 

 

Here's a picture of everything I had before I called:

They will ask you for some information about your modem:

  • Brand and Model #

  • Something called a MAC ADDRESS code that is found on the bottom of the modem

 

They’ll ask you to connect your modem to the wall with your coaxial cord (one end in the modem, one end in the wall) and to your router with an ethernet cable (both your modem and router will come with ethernet cables). Next, they will instruct you to let them know what color the lights are turning and if they are blinking or not.

 

Finally, they’ll ask you to open your computer and see if you can connect to the internet.

 

Here is an actual picture of the actual phone call I made to do this. This is just before I hung up. Truly 27 minutes and 44 seconds.

 

And here's proof that I did in fact get on the internet by the end of this call: 

Step 8: Ship or bring your rental modem back to Comcast if you have one

 

Step 9: Bathe in all of your extra cash. It cost me $66 to get the supplies to set up Comcast myself. I would have spent $120+ per year renting their modem.

 

 

 

Disclosure:

The owner of this site is not an investment advisor, financial planner, nor legal or tax professional and articles here are an opinion. The content on this site is intended to be educational and  used for general informational purposes only. It is not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. The owner of this sites assumes no liability for information provided above. The information may not be correct when applied to your specific situation. 

 

 

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